venerdì 23 marzo 2012

The thin thread of every story - 6Mois magazine


During the last festival in Perpignan, the international event on photojournalism, there was a queue in front of her desk: photographers from all aver the world with their book or their MacBook Air in their hands to show their portfolios. Marie-Pierre Subtil realized at that moment that 6 Mois, the magazine she founded and directs, << has become a landmark for the world of photojournalism>>.

Photo by Alessandra Sanguinetti







.































6 Mois is an idea that was born and grew quickly. The editors are all in two bright rooms of the palace of the publishing house Les Arènes, in the Rue Jacob in Paris. Three young journalists and Marie-Pierre Subtil (Editor in Chief) edit every issue alone.
Cover of the III number of  6Mois in bookstores by March 13, 2012 
Even for this << 6Mois is a biannual magazine. We need time to get things done with great care >> says the chief editor. The first issue came out a year ago and the sales have already exploded in France and abroad. A number every six months, 350 pages, 100 photographs, no advertising (unbelievable, I repeat: no advertising!), an average of 40 000 copies sold and a growing number of subscribers around the world, including Italy. 6 Mois was born in the spring of 2011, among the laughters of the experts who repeated: photojournalism is dead ... you are crazy .. The first run went out immediately and was quickly reprinted. Since March 13 there's the third number in the libraries. Africa is the theme of the cover issue. The texts are still only in French [even if publishers are working on co-publishing agreements with publishers in major local languages], however, nothing of the journal talks about France and the mix of photographers is truly international, if you look at the names of the authors of the second number: a Dane, a Frenchman, an Englishman, a Swede, an American, a Chinese, an Argentine and two Italian photographers [Alessandra Sanguinetti and Roberta Valerio.



Marie-Pierre Subtil 
Marie explains the idea behind the magazine: << We are in the post-globalization. Right in the post-Internet. On internet there are billions of new images every day of every kind and shape. The magazine takes the time to make a selection from the thousands of photographs produced of order and to organize them in a form that tells a story. Readers have learned that this is usefull>>. Marie explains that she chooses the photographs and the 'stories' to be published under a very subjective criterion: << If you strike me, if you touch me, it wiould touch the other >>. Each photo is mounted in a story as long and accompanied by captions that are written as a result of an intensive dialogue with the photographer who took the pictures. << I prefere photographs that come from a personal project of one author and that take time and passion. We are not interested in isolated scoop photos >>. For questions that arise about the subject of the photographic reportage, there is the article that follows each report.Then there is the formula of The World FotoBio or The World of dedicated to the imagery of a photographer. 6 Mois released in March and in October, costs 25 euros. For me it's worth it. Information and excerpts from the article whether the March issue of Elle. 

Photo by Vivian Maier

Il filo sottile di ogni storia

All'ultimo festival di Perpignan, l'appuntamento internazionale sul fotogiornalismo, davanti alla sua postazione c'era la coda: fotografi di tutto il mondo con il loro book o il loro MacBook Air tra le mani per mostrarle il loro portfolio. Marie-Pierre Subtil ha capito in quel momento che 6 Mois, la rivista che ha fondato e che dirige, <<è diventata un punto di riferimento per il fotogiornalismo mondiale>>.
Foto di Alessandra Sanguinetti

6 Mois è un'idea che è nata e si è sviluppata in fretta. La redazione sta tutta in due stanze luminose del palazzo della casa editrice Les Arènes, in Rue Jacob a Parigi. Tre giovani giornaliste e Marie-Pierre Subtil (Editor in Chief) montano da sole ogni numero.
Copertina del III numero del semestrale 6Mois nelle librerie dal 13 marzo 2012
<<Anche per questo 6 Mois è una rivista semestrale. Abbiamo bisogno di tempo per fare le cose con cura artigianale>> dice la redattrice capo. Il primo numero è uscito un anno fa e gli abbonamenti sono già esplosi, in Francia e all'estero. Un numero ogni sei mesi, 350 pagine, 100 fotografie, nessuna pubblicità (incredibile, ripeto: nessuna pubblicità!), una media di 40 mila copie vendute e un numero crescente di abbonamenti in tutto il mondo, Italia compresa. 6 Mois è nato nella primavera del 2011, tra le risate degli addetti ai lavori che ripetevano: il fotogiornalismo è morto... ma siete matti.. La prima tiratura è andata subito esaurita e si è ristampato rapidamente. Dal 13 marzo è nelle librerie il terzo numero. L'Africa è il tema di copertina. I testi sono ancora solo in francese [anche se gli editori stanno lavorando a degli accordi di coedizione con editori locali nelle principali lingue] però niente della rivista parla della Francia e il mix di fotografi è davvero internazionale se si guarda ai nomi degli autori del secondo numero: un danese, un francese, un inglese, uno svedese, un americano, un cinese, un argentino e due fotografe italiane [Alessandra Sanguinetti e Roberta Valerio
Foto di Vivian Maier

Marie spiega l'idea che è alla base del magazine: << Siamo in piena post-mondializzazione. In pieno post-Internet. Su internet ci sono ogni giorno miliardi di nuove immagini di ogni genere e forma. La nostra rivista prende il tempo di fare una selezione tra le migliaia di fotografie prodotte, di riordinarle e di organizzarle in una forma che racconti una storia. I lettori hanno capito che questo serve>>. 
Marie-Pierre Subtil  
Marie spiega anche che sceglie le fotografie e le 'storie' da pubblicare in base a un criterio molto soggettivo: <<Se mi colpiscono, se mi toccano, toccheranno anche gli altri>>. Ogni foto è montata come in un racconto e accompagnata da lunghe didascalie che vengono scritte a seguito di un intenso dialogo con il fotografo che le ha scattate. <<Predirigo le fotografie che nascono da un progetto personale dell'autore e che richiedono tempo e passione. Non ci interessano le foto scoop isolate>>. Per le domande che nascono nella letura c'è l'articolo che segue ogni reportage. Poi esiste la formula della FotoBiografia o Il Mondo di dedicato all'immaginario di un fotografo.
6 Mois esce a marzo e a ottobre, costa 25 euro. Per me ne vale la pena. 

Foto di Vivian Maier

Foto di Alessandra Sanguinetti

domenica 18 marzo 2012

The view that PARR has about PERESS

Leafing through a high and heavy volume of Magnum, I hit the review that the renowned photographer Martin Parr gave his colleague Gilles Peress (France, 1946). Both professional photographers, connoisseurs of film and light, Parr is the photojournalist of the grotesques trends of the dominant culture in the society; instead of Peress that is a war photojournalist.
Belfast, 1984, on the morning of the death of Bobby Sands  - Photo by GIlles Peress
Here's the comment from Martin Parr to Gilles Peress:

<< Gilles Peress gave two main contributions to the brief and turbulent history of the representation of conflict. First, has tried to understand what problems meets a photographer who is witness of the events. This happened in the book Telex Iran, published in 1984. The term "telex" refers to the means by which Peress communicated with the Paris offices of Magnum, when followed for five intense weeks, the hostage crisis in Iran. 

The problems related to being a witness, the choice to accept or decline appointments as they are or find the correct captions, are also the subject of the text that makes its way through a photo and the next. Apparently it does not seem a very radical stance but do not forget that the photojournalist should be the one who tells the truth. Confessing the subjective character of his work, Peress focuses on an important issue.

The second contribution comes from the way in which Peress frames his subjects.We always feel we are faced with a fragment, with people and things that are partly inside and partly outside the image. One gets the feeling that what we see is a small part of a larger and more chaotic scene. Since Peress often worked on war fronts, this is probably true in most cases. However, few photographers were able to evoke a feeling of energy and confusion with his own eloquence. His visual language draws its origins even for political reasons. Peress has tried to move away from the traditional style, common to many reporters, which tends to soften, with the symmetry and sharpness of the shot, even the stronger despair.
While depicting situations extremely confused, these images have a great appeal. 
Try to get seated and to decipher these complex, exciting photographs. I have never been in a country at war and, honestly, I hope I never have to have this experience. Yet I have the impression that the photographs by Gilles Peress  made me understand clearly what it means >>. 

Photo by Gilles Peress - In 1979, when Islamic fundamentalists occupied the U.S. embassy in Tehran and took  fifty-two  persons as hostage, Peress leaves for Iran. He spent five weeks in the heart of the revolution. His famous book, Telex Iran, in the name of Revolution, describes the fragile relationship that develops between American culture and that of Iran during the hostage crisis.

























Photo by Gilles Peress  

Photo by Gilles Peress  

CHI è PERESS secondo PARR

Sfogliando un alto e pesante volume della Magnum, mi ha colpito la recensione che il celebre fotografo Martin Parr ha dato del suo collega Gilles Peress (Francia, 1946). Entrambi fotografi professionisti, profondi conoscitori della pellicola e della luce, Parr è il fotogiornalista delle tendenze grottesche della cultura dominante e delle mode della società; Peress è invece fotogiornalista di guerra, che fin dagli anni dell'università si è interessato alle tematiche più drammatiche del mondo intorno a lui.
Foto di Gilles Peress - Quando nel 1979 i fondamentalisti islamici occupano l'ambasciata americana di Teheran e prendono in ostaggio cinquantadue persone, Peress parte per l'Iran. Trascorre cinque settimane nel cuore della rivoluzione . Il suo celeberrimo libro, Telex Iran: In the name of Revolution, descrive la fragile relazione che si instaura tra la cultura americana e quella iraniana durante la crisi degli ostaggi.


Ecco il commento di Martin Parr alle sue fotografie:

<< Gilles Peress ha dato due contributi essenziali alla breve e turbolenta storia della rappresentazione dei conflitti. In primo luogo, ha cercato di capire a quali problemi va incontro un fotografo che è testimone degli eventi  che racconta. Questo è avvenuto nel libro Telex Iran, pubblicato nel 1984. Il termine "telex" fa riferimento al mezzo di cui Peress si servì per comunicare con gli uffici parigini di Magnum, quando seguì, per cinque intense settimane, la crisi degli ostaggi in Iran. I problemi legati al fatto di essere un testimone, la scelta di accettare o meno gli incarichi così come vengono o di trovare le didascalie giuste, sono ugualmente oggetto del testo che si fa strada tra una foto e l'altra. Apparentemente non sembra una presa di posizione molto radicale ma non bisogna dimenticare che il fotogiornalista dovrebbe essere colui che racconta la verità. Confessando il carattere soggettivo del suo lavoro, Peress pone l'accento su un problema importante. 
Il secondo contributo di Peress deriva dal modo in cui inquadra i suoi soggetti. Abbiamo sempre la sensazione di trovarci di fronte ad un frammento, con persone e cose che appaiono in parte all'interno e in parte fuori dall'immagine. Si ha la sensazione che ciò che vediamo non sia che una piccola parte di una scena più grande e più caotica. Dal momento che Peress ha lavorato spesso su fronti di guerra, questo è probabilmente vero nella maggior parte dei casi. Tuttavia, pochi fotografi sono stati capaci di evocare una sensazione di energia e confusione con la sua stessa eloquenza. Il suo linguaggio visivo trae origini anche da ragioni politiche. Peress ha cercato di allontanarsi dallo stile tradizionale, comune a molti fotoreporter, che tende a smorzare, con la simmetria e la nitidezza dell'inquadratura, persino la disperazione più forte. 
Pur raffigurando situazioni estremamente confuse, queste immagini possiedono un grande fascino. A di là dell'estrema ricercatezza formale, le fotografie di Peress comunicano forti emozioni, come dimostrano le mani disperate degli uomini ripresi sul pullman croato, la determinazione dei bambini che corrono per strada a Belfast o le donne velate con i fucili a Teheran [vedere le immagini sotto].
Provate a mettervi seduti e a decifrare queste complicate, entusiasmanti fotografie. Io non sono mai stato in un paese in guerra e, onestamente, spero di non dover mai fare quest'esperienza. Eppure ho l'impressione che le fotografie di Gilles Peress mi abbiamo fatto capire cosa significhi>>. 
Fotilles Peress - Ebrei lasciano Sarajevo, Bosnia, 1993

Il quartiere di Ballymurphy la mattina della morte di Bobby Sands, Belfast, Irlanda del Nord, 1984

Foto di Gilles Peress



Foto di Gilles Peress - Teheran, 1979




Foto di Gilles Peress 






Foto di Gilles Peress 


Foto di Gilles Peress 


Foto di Gilles Peress 


Foto di Gilles Peress 

Foto di Gilles Peress - Teheran, 1979

Foto di Gilles Peress 




Foto di Gilles Peress 


Foto di Gilles Peress - Quando nel 1979 i fondamentalisti islamici occupano l'ambasciata americana di Teheran e prendono in ostaggio cinquantadue persone, Peress parte per l'Iran. Trascorre cinque settimane nel cuore della rivoluzione . Il suo celeberrimo libro, Telex Iran: In the name of Revolution, descrive la fragile relazione che si instaura tra la cultura americana e quella iraniana durante la crisi degli ostaggi.


mercoledì 14 marzo 2012

Photojournalists are too many

Don't miss the work of the young italian photographer Ruben Salvadori, which developed the project Photojournalism behind the scenes, a documentary about the world of photojournalism seen from inside. 
Photo by Ruben Salvadori

Salvadori has observed the dynamics that develop between photographers working in war zones, talked about the exaggerated number of photographers in the areas of crisis, and noted that the work of the photojournalist may be deliberately misleading, as he may decide to tell a fictitious reality, a drama that does not exist, and a conflict far more bloody than it actually is.
Today, in fact, the information industry requires drama, even when there is none. It is a law which will not escape the photographers, who often transform the conflict into a spectacle.
Ruben Salvadori chose to photograph the backstage of a scene that is repeated every Friday in Silwan, a suburb of Jerusalem. Here the young Palestinians improvised roadblocks and dozens of photographers are ready to take pictures of them: they are depicted with covered faces and surrounded by smoke, and seem to be involved in violent clashes with Israeli soldiers. But often the reality is quite different.

Photo by Ruben Salvadori 

Salvadori said in the video presentation of his project that his goal is to ensure that the public develops a critical sense with regard to the hundreds of images which are fed every day, but also to reflect on the massive presence of photojournalists in places of conflict.


Ruben Salvadori is an Italian photographer of 23 years old. He studied international relationships and anthropology at Jerusalem. These photos were taken in May 2011 and are part of the project Photojournalism behind the scenes. 

The contents of this post have been freely taken from www.Internazionale.it
Photo by Ruben Salvadori 

Photo by Ruben Salvadori 

Photo by Ruben Salvadori 

Photo by Ruben Salvadori 

Photo by Ruben Salvadori 


martedì 13 marzo 2012

Quando i fotografi sono troppi


Da non perdere il lavoro del giovane fotografo italiano Ruben Salvadori, PHOTOJOURNALISM BEHIND THE SCENES [dietro le quinte], un documentario sul mondo del fotogiornalismo visto dall'interno.

Foto di Ruben Salvadori

Salvadori ha osservato le dinamiche che si sviluppano tra i fotografi che lavorano nelle zone di guerra, ha parlato del numero esagerato di fotografi nelle aree di crisi, e ha rilevato che il risultato del lavoro del fotoreporter può essere volutamente fuorviante, in quanto egli può decidere di raccontare una realtà fittizia, un dramma che non esiste, e un conflitto molto più cruento di quanto non sia in realtà. Oggi, infatti, l'industria dell'informazione richiede drammaticità, anche quando non ce n'è. Si tratta di una legge da cui i fotografi non possono sottrarsi, e spesso trasformano il conflitto in uno spettacolo.

Foto di Ruben Salvadori 



Ruben Salvadori ha scelto di fotografare il backstage di una scena che si ripete ogni venerdì a Silwan, un sobborgo di Gerusalemme. Qui i giovani palestinesi improvvisato posti di blocco e decine di fotografi sono pronti ad immortalarli: i ragazzi sono ritratti con il volto coperto e circondati dal fumo e sembrano essere coinvolti in scontri violenti con soldati israeliani. Ma spesso la realtà è ben diversa.
Nel video di presentazione del suo progetto Salvadori ha dichiarato che tra i suoi obiettivi vi è quello di sensibilizzare il pubblico, facendo in modo che sviluppi un senso critico rispetto alle centinaia di immagini che gli vengono rifilate tutti i giorni. Il suo lavoro ci porta infatti a riflettere su un fatto che la maggior parte della popolazione occidentale ignora: l'elevatissima presenza dei fotoreporter nei luoghi di conflitto.

Ruben Salvadori è un fotografo italiano di 23 anni. Ha studiato antropologia erelazioni internazionali a Gerusalemme. Queste foto sono state prese nel maggio2011 e fanno parte del progetto Photojournalism behind the scenes.

I contenuti di questo post sono stati liberamente tratti da Internazionale.it
Foto di Ruben Salvadori 


Foto di Ruben Salvadori 

Foto di Ruben Salvadori 

Foto di Ruben Salvadori 

Foto di Ruben Salvadori